25 RTB: Books in Dark Times 2 Stephen McCauley (JP)

On March 20th, John talked to Stephen McCauley, author of such brilliant comic novels as Object of My Affection (also a Jennifer Aniston movie) and most recently My Ex-Life.

Steve brings light to dark corners in this the second installment of Books in Dark Times. He sings the praises of Charles Dickens, of Anthony Trollope (Elizabeth, offstage, chuckles delightedly) and the world-escaping delights of both Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited and the Mapp and Lucia novels of E. F. Benson. He concludes with sweet words for the sour genius of a trio of late 20th century American pessimists: Joan Didion, Dorothy Baker and Iris Owens.

Charles Dickens, “Little Dorrit” (1855-7)

W.S. Merwin, “The Essential

Hilary Mantel, “Wolf Hall” (2009)

Anthony Trollope, “The Last Chronicle of Barset” (1867)

Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, “Dangerous Liaisons” (1782)

P.G. Wodehouse, Jeeves Series

Evelyn Waugh, “Brideshead Revisited” (1945)

A still from the British television series, Brideshead Revisited

E. F Benson, Mapp and Lucia (1920-1939)

Christina Stead House of All Nations (1938; difficult genius, says Steve..)

Joan Didion, “Democracy” (1984)

Joan Didion, “Play It as it Lays” (1970)

Dorothy Baker “Cassandra at the Wedding” (1962)

Iris Owens, “After Claude” (1973; says Steve, you need suicide and even suicide wont help you…she gets abandoned by the cult even…)

Patricia Highsmith, the Ripley novels (1955-70)

Patrick White, “The Eye of the Storm” (1973)

[and of course, those penguins.…]

Listen to the Episode here:

Read the Transcript here:

Coming Soon: John and Elizabeth sit down together to discuss their own Books in Dark Times. Beth Blum on Self-Help from Dale Carnegie to its grim neo-Stoic present. Further BDT conversations with David Plotz, Seeta Chaganti and many more…..

Episode 5: The Comic Novel with Stephen McCauley

On this episode of Recall This Book, John talks to Stephen McCauley, a novelist and Professor of the Practice of English and Co-director of Creative Writing at Brandeis. Nobody knows more about the comic novel than Steve, and there is no comic novelist he loves better than Barbara Pym, a mid-century British comic genius who found herself forgotten and unpublishable in middle age, only to roar back into print in her sixties. Steve and John’s friendship over the years has been sealed by the favorite Pym lines they text back and forth to one another, so they are particularly keen to investigate why her career went in this way. Continue reading “Episode 5: The Comic Novel with Stephen McCauley”