48 Transform, Not Transfer: Lisa Dillman on Translation (PW, EF)

The eternal challenge (obsession) of translation: “how not to get lost in translation”.

Lisa Dillman

However, the award-winning translator and literary scholar at Emory University Lisa Dillman suggests that we may be missing the truly challenging and exhilarating part of translation in this endless and “elitist” obsession.

In fact, not “losing” original meaning may not be what translation is about at all.

“I find it more useful a view of translation, not as a transfer of meaning, but a transformation.”

Lisa Dillman

Lisa ought to know: she won the 2016 Best Translated Book Award for Fiction for her translation of Yuri Herrera‘s Signs Preceding the End of the World (2015), a multilingual patchwork of a book that follows its (tri-lingual) heroine Makina  across boundaries both geographic and linguistic. In fact, Lisa proposes it is Makina’s fluency in crossing those borders that makes her “so kickass”.

Elizabeth is joined by Brandeis comparative literature scholar Pu Wang. Loyal RTB listeners may remember Pu artfully translating for the acclaimed science fiction novelist Cixin Liu in episode 14. You can expect to hear Pu’s border-crossings in this one as well. Together, Lisa, Elizabeth, and Pu slip in and out of the indeterminate space of English, Spanish, indigenous language in a rural part of Mexico, Arabic, some of them, and all of them.

Mentioned in The Episode

Lawrence Venuti’s critique of the rhetoric of “loss” in The Translator’s Invisibility: A History of Translation (1995)

Jacques Derrida’s notion of textual indeterminacy (and post-structuralist reading of literature)

Karen Emmerich, Literary Translation and the Making of Originals (2017)

Yuri Herrera, Signs Preceding the End of the World

Diez Planetas (Lisa’s translation is on the way as Ten Planets)

Recallable Books

Lisa’s: Michael Cooperson’s translation of Al-Ḥarīrī’s “untranslatable” Arabic poetry collection Impostures (2020)

Pu’s: Dictionary of Untranslatables (2014), an encyclopedia of “untranslatable” philosophical words — “to be” is not to be translated.

Elizabeth’s: George Kalogeris’s Guide to Greece: Poems (2018), an exquisite exploration of writing Greek poetry in English, and in Massachusetts!

Listen and Read Here

48 Transform, Not Transfer: Lisa Dillman on Translation

Upcoming Episodes

We offer two rapid responses to the Capitol attack of January 6th.

Episode 49 features a discussion on the history of “asymmetrical policing” of black and white protestors or activists. Elizabeth and John talk with FBI and KKK expert David Cunningham–who first joined us to discuss white-supremacist policing back in Episode 36.

Episode 50 is a discussion of the racially-inflected genealogy of the words that are used to describe uprisings, rebellions and riots. Joining us is Brandeis historian Greg Childs, expert on political mobilizations and revolutions in the Americas.

47 Glimpsing COVID: Gael McGill on Data Visualization (GT, JP)

What’s a picture worth? How about the picture that allows scientists to grasp what’s actually going on in a cell–or on the spiky outside of an invading virus? Gael McGill, Director of Molecular Visualization at the Center for Molecular and Cellular Dynamics at Harvard Medical School is founder and CEO of Digizyme and has spent his career exploring and developing different modes for visualizing evidence.

For this scientific conversation, John is joined once again by Brandeis neuroscientist Gina Turrigiano (think ep 4 Madeline Miller; think ep 2 Addiction!). And because Gael’s work proves that a picture can be worth far more than a thousand words, our RTB post is more picturesque than usual. Start by checking out Digizyme‘s image of the spike protein attaching the SARS-CoV2 virus to a hapless cell and fusing their membranes:

Or maybe you’d rather click through to watch a gorgeous video Gael and his team have created?

Continue reading “47 Glimpsing COVID: Gael McGill on Data Visualization (GT, JP)”

46 Leah Price on Children’s Books: Turning Back the Clock on “Adulting” (EF, JP)

What do children love most about books? Leaving their mark on inviting white spaces? Or that enchanting feeling when a book marks them as its own, taking them off to where the wild things are? To understand childhood reading past and present, Elizabeth and John talk with the illustrious and illuminating book historian Leah Price. They explore the tactile and textual properties of great children’s books and debate adult fondness for juvenile literature. Leah asks if identifying with a literary character is a sign of virtuous imagination, or of craziness and laziness. She also schools John on what makes a good association copy, and reveals her son’s magic words when he wants her to tell a story: Read it!

For many years an English Professor at Harvard, Leah is founder and director of the Rutgers Initiative for the Book, and she tweets at @LeahAtWhatPrice. Her What We Talk About When We Talk About Books recently won Phi Beta Kappa’s Christian Gauss Award.

Sometime around the turn of the millennium, the concern about distinguishing between juvenile and adult books seemed to shift from moral panic about speeding up sexual maturity to worry about turning back the clock on what we now call adulting through the mainstreaming of young adult literature.

Continue reading “46 Leah Price on Children’s Books: Turning Back the Clock on “Adulting” (EF, JP)”

45 Global Policing 3 Laurence Ralph: Reckoning with Police Violence

In the third episode of our Global Policing series, Elizabeth and John speak with anthropologist Laurence Ralph about his 2020 book The Torture Letters: Reckoning with Police Violence. The book relates the decades-long history in which hundreds of people (mostly Black men) were tortured by the Chicago Police. Fascinatingly, it is framed as a series of open letters that explore the layers of silence and complicity that enabled torture and the activist movements that have helped to uncover this history and implement forms of collective redress and repair. Elizabeth and John ask Laurence about that genre choice, and he unpacks his thinking about responsibility, witnessing, trauma and channels of activism. Arendt’s “banality of evil” briefly surfaces.

Continue reading “45 Global Policing 3 Laurence Ralph: Reckoning with Police Violence”

In the third episode of our Global Policing series, Elizabeth and John speak with anthropologist Laurence Ralph about his 2020 book The Torture Letters: Reckoning with Police Violence. The book relates the decades-long history in which hundreds of people (mostly Black men) were tortured by the Chicago Police. Fascinatingly, it is framed as a series of open letters that explore the layers of silence and complicity that enabled torture and the activist movements that have helped to uncover this history and implement forms of collective redress and repair. Elizabeth and John ask Laurence about that genre choice, and he unpacks his thinking about responsibility, witnessing, trauma and channels of activism. Arendt’s “banality of evil” briefly surfaces.

Continue reading “45 Global Policing 3 Laurence Ralph: Reckoning with Police Violence”

44 Adaner Usmani: Racism as idea, Racism as power relation (EF, JP)

racism, mass incarceration, Southern plantation economy,
and W.E.B. Du Bois

Do we understand racism as the primary driving engine of American inequality? Or do we focus instead on the indirect ways that frequently hard-to-discern class inequality and inegalitarian power relations can produce racially differentiated outcomes? Adaner Usmani, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Social Studies at Harvard and on the editorial board at Catalyst joins Elizabeth and John to wrestle with the subtle and complex genealogy of Southern plantation economy and its racist legacy.

Continue reading “44 Adaner Usmani: Racism as idea, Racism as power relation (EF, JP)”

1 Minimalism with Tory Fair

In this episode, John and Elizabeth speak with Tory Fair, sculptor and professor in the Art Department at Brandeis about minimalism. They discuss the difference in involvement expected from the viewer of a minimalist work and other work, and compare modes of minimalism, from Donald Judd to Samuel Beckett to Marie Kondo. Their discussion of the correct amount of guidance to expect or to want from an artist also turns to a lively chat on the experience of going to the museum, and whether that is best approached as directed by the artist or curator, or as a search for an unexpected occurrence. Then in Recallable Art, Tory recommends the Daybook Installation at DIA by Anne Truitt, and John recommends Aesop’s fables. Continue reading “1 Minimalism with Tory Fair”